Posted 1 hour ago

pipers reaction to polly and larry is my reaction to polly and larry 

(Source: pilotstwentyone)

Posted 13 hours ago
socimages:

Tuskegee syphilis study recruitment letter.
By Gwen Sharp, PhD
The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment is one of the most famous examples of unethical research. The study, funded by the federal government from 1932-1972, looked at the effects of untreated syphilis. In order to do this, a number of Black men in Alabama who had syphilis were misinformed about their illness. They were told they had “bad blood” (which was sometimes a euphemism for syphilis, though not always) and that the government was offering special free treatments for the condition. Above is an example of a letter sent out to the men to recruit them for more examinations.
The “special free treatment” was, in fact, nothing of the sort. The researchers conducted various examinations, including spinal taps, not to treat syphilis but just to see what its effects were. In fact, by the 1950s it was well established that a shot of penicillin would fully cure early-stage syphilis. Not only were the men not offered this life-saving treatment, the researchers conspired to be sure they didn’t find out about it, getting local doctors to agree that if any of the study subjects came in they wouldn’t tell them they had syphilis or that a cure was available.
The abusive nature of this study is obvious (letting men die slow deaths that could have been easily prevented, just for the sake of scientific curiosity) and shows the ways that racism can influence researchers’ evaluations of what is acceptable risk and whose lives matter. The Tuskegee experiment was a major cause for the emergence of human subjects protection requirements and oversight of federally-funded research once the study was exposed in the early 1970s. Some scholars argue that knowledge of the Tuskegee study increased African Americans’ distrust of the medical community, a suspicion that lingers to this day.
In 1997 President Clinton officially apologized for the experiment.
Gwen Sharp is an associate professor of sociology at Nevada State College. You can follow her on Twitter at @gwensharpnv.

socimages:

Tuskegee syphilis study recruitment letter.

By Gwen Sharp, PhD

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment is one of the most famous examples of unethical research. The study, funded by the federal government from 1932-1972, looked at the effects of untreated syphilis. In order to do this, a number of Black men in Alabama who had syphilis were misinformed about their illness. They were told they had “bad blood” (which was sometimes a euphemism for syphilis, though not always) and that the government was offering special free treatments for the condition. Above is an example of a letter sent out to the men to recruit them for more examinations.

The “special free treatment” was, in fact, nothing of the sort. The researchers conducted various examinations, including spinal taps, not to treat syphilis but just to see what its effects were. In fact, by the 1950s it was well established that a shot of penicillin would fully cure early-stage syphilis. Not only were the men not offered this life-saving treatment, the researchers conspired to be sure they didn’t find out about it, getting local doctors to agree that if any of the study subjects came in they wouldn’t tell them they had syphilis or that a cure was available.

The abusive nature of this study is obvious (letting men die slow deaths that could have been easily prevented, just for the sake of scientific curiosity) and shows the ways that racism can influence researchers’ evaluations of what is acceptable risk and whose lives matter. The Tuskegee experiment was a major cause for the emergence of human subjects protection requirements and oversight of federally-funded research once the study was exposed in the early 1970s. Some scholars argue that knowledge of the Tuskegee study increased African Americans’ distrust of the medical community, a suspicion that lingers to this day.

In 1997 President Clinton officially apologized for the experiment.

Gwen Sharp is an associate professor of sociology at Nevada State College. You can follow her on Twitter at @gwensharpnv.

Posted 13 hours ago

Joe Russo: We always said that the whole movie lives or dies on that last scene between him and Bucky. You know, this third act is a fait accompli in a way. It’s a superhero movie.

Steve McFeely: I suspect he will win.

Joe Russo: The expectation is that he will win. But the real story is will he win Bucky, will he save his friend, will his friend kill him, will he have to kill his friend? The tragedy of that moment was the most important thing to us as directors in the third act. That’s the real climax of the act. 

Steve McFeely: Yeah, from jump street we always worked towards getting to: “I will sacrifice myself in order to reach my friend.” And so “end of the line” has been the line since the very beginning. And Sebastian nails it, it cracks him. 

Chris Markus: Again, it’s about Steve trying to save his past.

Joe Russo: It’s the last thing he has left.

- Captain America: The Winter Soldier Blu-ray Audio Commentary

(Source: firstenchantervivienne)

Posted 17 hours ago

starscreamsswayinghips:

because-chris-evans:

durnesque-esque:

littlelottie:

I did a thing…

you did a beautiful thing

you did a perfect thing

IT FITS PERFECTLY.

Posted 17 hours ago

capsicle107:

I appreciate that his brother has successfully learned how to block the left boob grab.

(Source: smuchshypush)

Posted 17 hours ago

girldwarf:

I have this theory that resting bitch face is actually just every girl’s face in its natural state, and it only seems rare and mean b/c most women are conditioned to be in constant state of smiling and using facial expressuons to subtly submit to people around them

Posted 17 hours ago

hodak:

whowasminein99:

this will be my child

#preach

(Source: twoheadedshark)

Posted 21 hours ago

wordssetinstony:

disneyprincessanna:

joeycontemporary:

in case it hasn’t hit you yet: Tiana is the first Disney Princess from America.

Bitch, please 
image

I can paint with all the colors of your ignorance

(Source: jocontemporary)

Posted 21 hours ago
  1. mom: don't eat the cookies yet, they just came out of the oven and are too hot
  2. me: fire cannot kill a dragon
Posted 21 hours ago
Posted 1 day ago

licensed-to-ruffle-dat-hair:

the-art-of-fangirling:

seriously like every British thing ever has john hurt in it

see like

harry potter

image

merlin

image

doctor who

image

sherlock

image

Did you just

Posted 1 day ago

thesilverdragonfly:

Can we all take a moment to appreciate how freaking awesome Donna Noble is?

Posted 1 day ago
Posted 2 days ago

danisnotonfire:

phil and i attempted to play Portal 2 co-op but phil with phil wearing a blindfold it dID NOT GO VERY WELL

Posted 2 days ago